Yarrow

Yarrow

Yarrow

Yarrow acts as an astringent, and with boils, also infection and inflammation, wounds and hemorrhoids.

Yarrow has seen historical use as a medicine, often because of its astringent effects. is generally used as an anti-inflammatory or in chest rubs for colds and influenza. For a massage oil for inflamed joints

The leaves encourage clotting,

Yarrow intensifies the medicinal action of other herbs taken with it,

The salicylic acid derivatives are a component of aspirin, which may account for its use in treating fevers and reducing pain. Yarrow tea is also said to be able to clear up a cold within 24 hours. Yarrow has also been used as a Quinine substitute.

Yarrow was also used in traditional Native American herbal medicine. Navajo Indians considered it to be a “life medicine”, chewed it for toothaches, and poured an infusion into ears for earaches. Several tribes of the Plains region of the United States used common yarrow. The Pawnee used the stalk for pain relief. The Chippewa used the leaves for headaches by inhaling it in a steam. They also chewed the roots and applied the saliva to their appendages as a stimulant. The Cherokee drank a tea of common yarrow to reduce fever and aid in restful sleep.

The British Herbal Compendium notes that preparations of yarrow lower fevers, induce sweating, stop cramps, encourage menstruation, relieve inflammation, and stimulate the release of stomach acid to digest proteins and fats. The herb is taken internally to treat colds, fevers, and indigestion, and used in skin treatments of slow-healing wounds. The Complete German Commission E Monographs recommends sitz baths with yarrow added to the bath water to relieve pelvic cramps in women.

For Educational purposes only.
This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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